Discover Seattle!

General Category => Discover Seattle! => Topic started by: TehBorken on May 29 14 12:21

Title: Workshop
Post by: TehBorken on May 29 14 12:21
I got tired of trying to do stuff in my garage, so I built a workshop in what used to be our rec room. Anyone interested in seeing some pics?
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: kitten on May 29 14 04:18
I'd love to see them!  Seeing what other people have done to improve their homes is a source of endless fascination to me.
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: P.C. on May 29 14 06:21
I'm totally interested in seeing them !
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: Lil Me on May 29 14 07:10
Yes please!
What projects are you working on now?
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: kitten on May 29 14 11:41
How soon can we expect to see the pictures, TehBorken Sir?
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: TehBorken on May 30 14 04:56
I'll get some up today.
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: TehBorken on May 30 14 05:36
Initial build images.

Starting out...first bit of carpet taken up to make space for the south wall bench.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2444-800.jpg)


Got my wood...about $250 total. I'm using 2x4s for the frame and two layers of 3/4" plywood for the table underlay. The bench top itself will be covered in a 1/4" sheet of Masonite (tempered fiberboard). That way when it gets too dinged up or damaged I can strip off the Masonite and put a new layer down. Total thickness will be 1.75".
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2457-800.jpg)

Gotta clean the floor and get the tooling ready.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2458-800.jpg)


First brace mounted to the south wall with 4" lag bolts screwed into the studs.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2459-800.jpg)


Cross beam hangers mounted with 1.5" pan head screws. I had to do it this way because the other side wasn't accessible after hanging the brace. Otherwise I'd have had to assemble the entire top frame and then hang it, which just wasn't practical.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2461-800.jpg)


Another shot of the same phase.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2462-800.jpg)


Finally...something to see. :)
The top frame mostly complete, held up with some temporary leg braces. I used a lot of screws in this, in fact the entire thing was built using screws. Lots and lots of screws.

(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2464-800.jpg)


Another view of the top frame, just for reference.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2465-800.jpg)

Next batch of pics will be up tonight or tomorrow. Or possibly today if I have some time. :)
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: Lil Me on May 30 14 10:20
Great job!  Look forward to more photos.
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: kitten on May 30 14 03:51
Beautiful job.  I read somewhere that Real Men Wear Tool Belts,  so you are proving yourself to be a total MAN!  Sakha must be so proud of you.
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: TehBorken on May 30 14 04:51
Okay....where were we? Oh yeah...

A close-in detail of the floating back brace. This will be used to support the lower shelf and also helps to add some stiffness to the table frame.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2508-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2508-800.jpg)


The front and back lower frame now almost complete, and some of the legs have been added. I used 4x4s for support so it can take some serious weight and pounding.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2514-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2514-800.jpg)


Basic frame complete except for the front-to-back stringers on the bottom.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2523-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2523-800.jpg)


This is a small jig that I made to ensure that the stringers (and other connections) were all drilled uniformly. I used 3.5" deck screws almost everywhere. When clamped in place it allowed me to dispense with marking every single hole individually before drilling. This saved a ton of time.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2525-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2525-800.jpg)


Getting ready to do some ripping of the tops and some other bit (like the stringers/stiffeners). The 4'x8' 3/4" plywood was ripped to 28" deep for the top work surface. (I prefer a deep work top with lots of room to move stuff around.)
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2529-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2529-800.jpg)


Lower stringers added. Note the temp work top surface (not attached, just laid in place for convenience).
The bottom of the lower rail is set 8" above the floor to allow space for some nice tall drawers that will slide in and out.

(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2531-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2531-800.jpg)

More to come later. :)
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: kitten on May 30 14 07:30
Looking good so far.  Beautiful work.
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: TehBorken on May 31 14 06:35
Thank you!

Looking good so far.  Beautiful work.
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: TehBorken on May 31 14 06:55
Okay, moving along..... :)

A shot from underneath, the bench frame is now about 90% complete. This shows a couple of the load-bearing uprights that run from the bottom of the upper frame down to the floor, fitting behind the floating back brace.

(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2540-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2540-800.jpg)


Aaaaaaand we're basically done with the major frame assembly at this point. Bloody hell. The space you see between the top of the frame and the trim piece under the window shows how thick the bench top will be. Yeah, it's a hefty top.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2548-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2548-800.jpg)



Before going any further, I used Quikrete to seal around the bottoms of all of the uprights and legs. This helps the posts make good contact by filling in any voids or uneven areas and also prevents any liquids (water, oils, etc) from getting under the legs. It also helps dampen noise and vibration from or to the table. It dries to a hard state while still retaining a little bit of elasticity.

(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2573-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2573-800.jpg)



The first section of the lower shelf being cut and fitted into place. Some of this area will have drawers built in later, some will be left open for storage and "knee space". This took longer than expected. I must have put this in and taken it out 20 times in order to get the exact fit I wanted.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2551-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2551-800.jpg)


More of the lower shelf installed. This was far more laborious than it should have been.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2553-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2553-800.jpg)


And the last bit of the lower shelf is screwed in place. Whew. I don't know why but this part was just a bear to do.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2571-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2571-800.jpg)


Finally we get to the point where the first part of the bench top is fitted. It's clamped down because some of the plywood had a slight bow to it (not uncommon). The clamps also make sure that it doesn't shift while the underlayment is screwed down. The underlayment is made from 2 layers of 3/4" plywood, and then a 1/4" layer of tempered Masonite is laid down on top of that.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2566-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2566-800.jpg)

So far so good. :)
Soon we get to the fun stuff instead of all this dreadful framing crap.

Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: kitten on May 31 14 02:02
What a massive amount of work you're putting into this.  This is going to last forever!
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: TehBorken on May 31 14 06:58
What a massive amount of work you're putting into this.  This is going to last forever!

I hope so. :) 

However....because it's 100% screwed together it could be completely taken apart in a few hours by anyone with a good cordless drill/screwdriver. (It would come apart waaaaaay faster than it went together, lol.) If and when I sell this place I might do that depending on what the buyer wants.

It is sturdy though...you could park a car on top of it and it would hold up just fine, lol. :)
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: TehBorken on May 31 14 07:23
Okay, continuing on... :)

The first 8ft of the underlayment is in place and screwed down securely.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2578-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2578-800.jpg)


This gives you idea of the bench top thickness, alough there's still 1/4" of Masonite that goes on top. It's pretty solid. :)
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2580-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2580-800.jpg)


Thar she blows...the first 16ft of bench top complete with the Masonite cover piece. Notice how it comes right up to the bottom of the window ledge molding.

(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2588-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2588-800.jpg)


The Masonite provides a nice, visually-neutral work surface that's resistant to most oils and paints. It's a hard-finish surface that's very smooth and durable, yet easy on the eyes.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2590-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2590-800.jpg)


The basic bench, minus the backboard and drawers. The bench will also wrap around the wall to the right, which is where all the dust-making stuff will be (drill press, grinders, sanders, etc). I'll post the photos of that section later. There's also some paint and trim that'll be added to make it look nicer. :)
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2592-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2592-800.jpg)


This is one of the backboards being painted with 3 coats of matte grey floor paint. It's 3/4" plywood left over from ripping the 4x8 sheets.
I didn't really want to cover up the windows with a backboard but I know that it's only a matter of time until some piece of something goes whizzing off and breaks a window. The backboard isn't full-height so some daylight does still make it in the windows. :)

(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2602-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2602-800.jpg)


Last pic in this series is a pull-out slider that holds a drill and misc drill accessories in some little bins. This runs on some extension sliders so it glides in and out smoothly. This turned out to be super-handy so I may add a couple more of these. 
:)
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2654-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2654-800.jpg)

Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: kitten on May 31 14 08:46
That is really beautiful.  You are doing an amazing job.  I love the colour of the paint you have used, and it looks like you have great light to work with.  The windows should give you plenty of light for your projects.
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: TehBorken on Jun 02 14 06:40
Thank you Kitten. :) As for colors, I opted for a neutral grey for most of it because it's a color that's easy on the eyes and has a low glare factor.

That is really beautiful.  You are doing an amazing job.  I love the colour of the paint you have used, and it looks like you have great light to work with.  The windows should give you plenty of light for your projects.
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: TehBorken on Jun 02 14 07:10
Alright, now we can get to some of the more interesting stuff. Well, interesting to me anyway. :)

This is actually something I'm slightly proud of: a custom "drill holster". It's made from a $2 PVC plastic pipe coupler. I just heated it with a heat gun until it was soft, then I shoved the drill into it and pressed it until it fit snugly. The alternative was a $20 drill hanger that was really pretty crappy. I like mine much better.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2610-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2610-800.jpg)


Now the backboards are mounted to the wall and window sill. They're also joined in the center with a 1x4" strip screwed in from the front. Lots of room to mount stuff, as we'll see. :)
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2617-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2617-800.jpg)


A top shelf is mounted on the backboard giving us more room to store frequently used items (cans, wipers, etc). It also provides a good place to mount multiple swing-arm task lights. I'm big on lighting, especially for working on small, delicate stuff. You can never have too much light. The two power strips below are just about to be mounted to the backboard. You can also never have too many power outlets, lol.

(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2624-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2624-800.jpg)


The power strips are mounted and the connecting cords are run through holes with the cords protected by more pipe couplers.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2639-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2639-800.jpg)


A few tool racks, bins, and tool hangers are mounted to the backboard (with many more to come). And I can now use the bench to finish the bench. The yellow gun on the right is my trusty heat gun. A heat gun is used to quickly ruin things that are sensitive or delicate or expensive. Every shop should have one.

(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2651-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2651-800.jpg)


And FINALLY I get to build some drawers. I didn't photograph the drawer building process, but I should have. These are 2'x2' drawers, 4" tall. They're on runners made of a slippery polypropylene material. I hate installing those sliding track things, they're such a PITA to do that I avoid them if I can. Also, doing it this way supports more weight than using drawer slides (and drawer slides cost ~$25 a pair, too).

(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2676-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2676-800.jpg)


They look okay, but the next set will be a little nicer. The drawers cost about $50 or $60 to make, not too bad. They're nice and sturdy, slide well, and hold a ton of stuff. These don't show the handles (pulls) installed, but Ill post a shot of that later. I used some nice European-style drawer pulls that I had left over from about 20 years ago (really).

(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2684cropped.JPG) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2684cropped.JPG)
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: TehBorken on Jun 05 14 10:39
After a short break, we continue (try to contain your excitement, ladies!)

Every workbench needs a vise, right? So I transferred my trusty vise to the new bench. This vise is 30+ years old (maybe closer to 40 years old, now that I think about it).
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2698-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2698-800.jpg)


And I used some BABs (big-ass bolts) to secure it. Drilled right down through the 2x4 to attach it. That thing isn't gong anywhere.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2700-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2700-800.jpg)

Now we start the second half of the bench along the west wall, a much easier build. This is where the grinder, drill press, etc will go. The back will have a gap meant for piping dust collection tubes up through it.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2702-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2702-800.jpg)


Screw it in place and add a little bracing....
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2716-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2716-800.jpg)


The plywood top set on top but not screwed down. This one is cut a little shallow to allow for the dust-collection hoses I mentioned earlier. The plywood is bowed but that isn't unusual; it'll flatten out once it's screwed down.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2703-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2703-800.jpg)


The open channel on the right is where the hoses and power cords will run, plumbed to a shop-vac that will sit under the table.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2710-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2710-800.jpg)


I also built a nice deep drawer to hold stuff like my circular saw and other gear that's too big for a regular drawer. You can also see the drawer pulls installed on the top set of drawers.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2717-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2717-800.jpg)

(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2718-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2718-800.jpg)

Not done yet, but getting closer. :)
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: DDD on Jun 06 14 02:31
overkill GREAT JOB !  I like when things are done better than needed built to last.............word :)
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: kitten on Jun 08 14 09:46
Those handles are beautiful.  I'm curious to find out what kind of handles you will use for the rest of the drawers you will be building, in order to complement these that you have put in.  Perhaps black in a similar style?
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: TehBorken on Jun 09 14 02:16
Kitten, these are the handles I'm using. I have a whole bunch of them left over from an old, old project. I might paint them but until I get rid of them if I need a handle this is what I'll be using for the foreseeable future. :)  I may very well have a lifetime supply. :( 

(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2935-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2935-800.jpg)


The west wall bench is ~90% done here and some of the tools moved over. The grinder in the left coner will eventually sit on a 20" lazy-susan turntable so two grinders can be mounted back-to-back (one with grinding wheels, one with buffing wheels).
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2938-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2938-800.jpg)


This shopvac is used for general cleanup with a wand on a 9-ft hose.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2949-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2949-800.jpg)


...while this one is plumbed up to the various tools on top, as shown in the next picture.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2950-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2950-800.jpg)


The collection hoses (and power cords) run up through the gap in the back and directly into the tool. This really cuts down on the dust.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2954-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2954-800.jpg)(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2959-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2959-800.jpg)



Here's a panorama of most of it.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2948-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2948-800.jpg)





Plenty of light though the windows, too much to take a good picture facing south.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2964-800.jpg) (http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2964-800.jpg)




I faced the bench fronts with some 1x4" hemlock strips . Hemlock has a subtle light grain that comes out nicely after a few coats of polish and sealer. The strip in front has 4 coats, the one on the right has two (so far). The photo kind of washes out the grain, it actually looks better/deeper than what you see here.
(http://discoverseattle.net/workshop/SAM_2946-800.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: kitten on Jun 09 14 07:51
The workshop is amazing, TehBorken!  So beautiful, and you must have every tool known to man in there!  Just incredible.  I love how it looks, and you also have a gorgeous view out your window for while you are sitting there planning your next project.
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: Russ on Jun 23 14 03:05
Wow TB. That is built, as I like to put it, like a brick sh*thouse. Overbuilt. But I do the same, then you never have to fix it later on.


I like the thought you put into it, with the electrical plugs, and the space at the back of your L bench on the side for the dust hoses.


I am amazed your wife allowed you to put something like that into your house. Mine would kill me before even answering no. I need to redo my storage in my garages and carports. I refuse to admit I have to downsize my stuff. I need those three axles for a vehicle I dont have anymore.


I like all the lag bolts and screws to put it together. I hate nails, I prefer something that wont come loose over time.


That quickcrete or whatever its called under the legs is brilliant. REALLY good idea! Im going to use it, if you dont mind.
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: P.C. on Jun 23 14 08:13
Fabulous, Tehborken !  Super well done !


So what are you going to build first ?
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: TehBorken on Jun 25 14 05:17
I'm glad you like it, it was actually a lot of fun to build.


That quickcrete or whatever its called under the legs is brilliant. REALLY good idea! Im going to use it, if you dont mind.

By all means. :)
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: TehBorken on Jun 25 14 05:27
Thank you. :)

As for what I'm going to do, I'm planning on doing some light woodworking and also some plastic fabrication using a material called Kydex (https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=Kydex) (and a similar material called "Holstex").

Basically you heat up the plastic sheet and then pressure form it over an object so it molds to the item and takes on its shape. It's used a lot to make pistol holsters and knife sheaths.

I'm going to use it to make a specific type of holster. There are a lot of people using Kydex to make holsters and stuff, but no one makes a "Level 2" style holster, which is what I want.

A Level 2 holster has a safety interlock that mechanically locks the gun into the holster so that you have to depress a button or other latch to release the gun. Here's an example of a Level 2 rig (http://theseegroup.com/blle2selibef.html). Notice the latch in the middle of the holster...if it's not depressed then the gun can't be pulled from the holster.

I've been making prototypes (and building the actual Kydex press) so I'm getting ready to actually do some test runs. I'll post pics if anyone's interested.



Fabulous, Tehborken !  Super well done !


So what are you going to build first ?
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: Russ on Jun 25 14 03:06
Why would you want that on a holster? Wouldn't it be easier to have a band at the top with something like a button? So you release it once and it's off until you resecure it?
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: TehBorken on Jun 25 14 03:23
The idea behind an L2 holster is to prevent someone from grabbing your sidearm out of your holster. A simple snap or band is very easy to undo and lets someone steal or remove your gun pretty easily. Suddenly someone else has your gun, and that has "bad ending" written all over it.

FYI, most of the simple bands/snaps that you see on police holsters are fake; that is, they don't actually undo anything. They're often strictly cosmetic *OR* they undo in a different manner than it appears they do (like with a hidden catch or snap from the opposite side). This is to keep someone from grabbing the officer's gun- someone who tries to get the gun will be fumbling with the fake strap, giving the officer time to act.

The way one of my (store bought) L2 holsters works is that as you fit the gun down into the holster, a catch automatically locks the gun so you don't have to manually reengage it. You just slide it in and *click* it's locked in place. This is what I want to replicate (and actually improve on a bit).

The only problem is that L2 holsters usually need to be made to fit a specific firearm; one made for a Glock won't fit a Smith & Wesson and vice versa. That's why a kydex press is needed, so you can make one from a particular sample gun or a specific personal sidearm.


Why would you want that on a holster? Wouldn't it be easier to have a band at the top with something like a button? So you release it once and it's off until you resecure it?
Title: Re: Workshop
Post by: Russ on Jun 25 14 05:39
Interesting. Thanks TB. Was wondering if it had a LEO slant to it.